0ctober Issue 2 2011

Impact of taxes and levies on the competitiveness of the flower industry in eastern Africa region

The fourth video conference on the impact of taxes and levies on the competitiveness of the flower industry in eastern Africa region was held on 4th October 2011 at the Kenya Institute of Administration. The World Bank jointly with Kenya Flower Council, the EU All ACP Agricultural Commodities Trust Fund Program (EU AAACP), and the African Caribbean Pacific organized a series of interactive Video Conference (VC) seminars that will elucidate challenges facing the Flower Industry in East African Region (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Ethiopia).

The five VCs are addressing global competitiveness of the flower industry in the East African

Region, the impact of agro-bacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and other soil borne diseases on production of roses, the impact of climate change and multiple taxies and levies on the industry, and role of Strategic Environment Assessment in the establishment of sustainable flower farms.

The report will be shared after the consultant has compiled.

East Africa, Europe to Resume Trade Negotiations

Technical level negotiators from the European Union (EU) and the East African Community (EAC) met in Zanzibar to set an agenda for the blocs’ trade negotiations for the coming months.

A statement, availed to The Citizen by the press and information officer at the delegation of the EU in Tanzania, Mr Emmanuel Kihaule, noted yesterday that the Zanzibar meetings which came after a 14-month break, made good progress in setting an agenda for negotiations over the coming months.

The parties jointly agreed to make progress in negotiations in particular on three fronts economic and development co-operation; rules of origin and agriculture.

The next formal joint negotiation session is scheduled to take place in mid December; a number of inter-session meetings at expert level will prepare the ground.

“We are pleased that the EAC/EU EPA negotiations have recommenced.” said Peter Thompson the senior official leading the EU negotiation team. “Last week’s meetings allowed us to map the areas still remaining to be negotiated.

The EU views the comprehensive EPA negotiations as an opportunity to settle the outstanding matters – such as agriculture and development co-operation.”

The EAC is embarking on an ambitious and successful regional integration process. The EU which has built its own prosperity on a model of regional integration is seeking to further strengthen this local integration process by maintaining a unified trade regime with EAC partner countries through a comprehensive EPA.

A successful outcome of the EPA negotiations will consolidate and strengthen the EAC regional integration and promote the competitiveness of EAC products. In meetings with Peter Thompson, Tanzanian private sector organizations marked their full support for the rapid conclusion of an EPA.

Source: AllAfrica: The Citizen

EU Carbon Market Proposal Colours UN Climate Talks

The European Union, clamoring for a life raft to save the carbon market, recently introduced a formal proposal to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for a new market-based mechanism that would promote projects in developing countries. The proposal, if agreed, would provide a new basis for the carbon market in lieu of the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), if countries are unable to clarify the future of the Protocol. The proposal came in the lead-up to this week’s UN climate change negotiations, which are currently underway in Panama City, Panama.

Hard Times for Dutch Rose Growers

The production of roses in the Netherlands has become more and more difficult. Besides the increased competition from Africa and South America, Dutch growers face problems to control pests and diseases. A new plan from the Dutch growers association LTO, must recover the Dutch rose industry. While in the past years the availability of permitted chemical pesticides has gone down, the introduction of biological alternatives did not increase with the same speed. As a result, there are not enough pesticides to control pests and diseases in roses. In response to this, growers are using illegal pesticides. This can be read in the Dutch magazine Vakblad voor de Bloemisterij.

According to the rose grower and spokesman of the LTO, Joop van den Nouweland, besides the government and growers organisation LTO growers themselves can be blamed for the present lack of proper pesticides.  “Growers have been waiting too long to express their concerns,” mentions Van den Nouweland in the article in the Dutch magazine. According to him, in the short term, more crop protection products should be made available and growers should share their experiences.

To strengthen the position of the Dutch rose growers in the long run, a number of Dutch organizations, including LTO and FloraHolland, are participating in the Action Plan Rose. This plan focuses on a profitable rose production by 2020. The plan is based on three pillars:

1) development of cultivation systems that are less depended on chemical pesticides;

2) creation of durable certified marketing chains, and

3) within a short time – accomplishment of an effective remedies package.

source: HortiBiz / Vakblad vd Bloemisterij

Health Tips: Breast Cancer

By: AAR

Did you know that breast tumors are the most prevalent tumors among women and affects about one million women worldwide?

Did you also know that breast tumors affect men also?

Women and men should examine their breasts regularly to identify lumps or abnormalities that could signal breast tumors.  Women who are under 40 with either a family history of breast tumor or other concerns about their personal risk should consult a medical professional about when to begin mammography.

A clinical breast exam should be part of the routine checkup.  Beginning at age 20 women should have a clinical breast exam every two to three years.  Women age 40 and older should have one every year.

If you find something that you know is unusual for you, have a health care provider check it out.  A LUMP YOU FIND SHOULD NEVER BE IGNORED.

Breast self checks are key to better breast health.

As you do your exam, keep in mind that your aim is to become acquainted with how your breasts normally LOOK and FEEL.  Your knowledge of your breast texture and appearance will increase the more you perform breast checks.  This knowledge will help you identify a change more quickly, which should be reported to your health care provider.

Some of the changes you should watch out for include:
•    Lump or thickening in or near the breast or underarm area
•    Change in size or shape of the breast
•    Puckering, dimpling or redness of the breast.

If you find a lump, DO NOT PANIC!
Remember, a change you see or feel in your breast does not automatically mean you have breast tumor.  But it is best to report any change to your health care provider for further evaluation.

Here are the five basic steps to a breast self-exam:-
Step 1 – Standing with your shoulders straight and your arms on your hips, face a mirror. Look for any differences in size, shape, color, swelling or bulging of the skin, changes in the nipple, or any signs of redness or rash.
Step 2 – Raise your arms, and examine your breasts for any of those differences.
Step 3 – Gently squeeze each nipple to check for any discharge.
Step 4 – Lie down, and feel each breast with the hand of the opposite arm. Feel all the tissue, applying pressure to check deep tissue for any lumps or abnormalities.
Step 5 – Examine the breasts while you are standing or sitting, gently examining the entire breast. You may want to try this method in the shower, while the skin is slippery.

This month AAR will be offering free Breast Examinations at all they clinics for both members and non members.

Remember breast cancer is curable when detected early.

Impact of taxes and levies on the competitiveness of the flower industry in eastern Africa region

The fourth video conference on the impact of taxes and levies on the competitiveness of the flower industry in eastern Africa region was held on 4th October 2011 at the Kenya Institute of Administration. The World Bank jointly with Kenya Flower Council, the EU All ACP Agricultural Commodities Trust Fund Program (EU AAACP), and the African Caribbean Pacific organized a series of interactive Video Conference (VC) seminars that will elucidate challenges facing the Flower Industry in East African Region (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Ethiopia).

The five VCs are addressing global competitiveness of the flower industry in the East African

Region, the impact of agro-bacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) and other soil borne diseases on production of roses, the impact of climate change and multiple taxies and levies on the industry, and role of Strategic Environment Assessment in the establishment of sustainable flower farms.

The report will be shared after the consultant has compiled.

East Africa, Europe to Resume Trade Negotiations

Technical level negotiators from the European Union (EU) and the East African Community (EAC) met in Zanzibar to set an agenda for the blocs’ trade negotiations for the coming months.

A statement, availed to The Citizen by the press and information officer at the delegation of the EU in Tanzania, Mr Emmanuel Kihaule, noted yesterday that the Zanzibar meetings which came after a 14-month break, made good progress in setting an agenda for negotiations over the coming months.

The parties jointly agreed to make progress in negotiations in particular on three fronts economic and development co-operation; rules of origin and agriculture.

The next formal joint negotiation session is scheduled to take place in mid December; a number of inter-session meetings at expert level will prepare the ground.

“We are pleased that the EAC/EU EPA negotiations have recommenced.” said Peter Thompson the senior official leading the EU negotiation team. “Last week’s meetings allowed us to map the areas still remaining to be negotiated.

The EU views the comprehensive EPA negotiations as an opportunity to settle the outstanding matters – such as agriculture and development co-operation.”

The EAC is embarking on an ambitious and successful regional integration process. The EU which has built its own prosperity on a model of regional integration is seeking to further strengthen this local integration process by maintaining a unified trade regime with EAC partner countries through a comprehensive EPA.

A successful outcome of the EPA negotiations will consolidate and strengthen the EAC regional integration and promote the competitiveness of EAC products. In meetings with Peter Thompson, Tanzanian private sector organizations marked their full support for the rapid conclusion of an EPA.

Source: AllAfrica: The Citizen

EU Carbon Market Proposal Colours UN Climate Talks

The European Union, clamoring for a life raft to save the carbon market, recently introduced a formal proposal to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) for a new market-based mechanism that would promote projects in developing countries. The proposal, if agreed, would provide a new basis for the carbon market in lieu of the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), if countries are unable to clarify the future of the Protocol. The proposal came in the lead-up to this week’s UN climate change negotiations, which are currently underway in Panama City, Panama.

Hard Times for Dutch Rose Growers

The production of roses in the Netherlands has become more and more difficult. Besides the increased competition from Africa and South America, Dutch growers face problems to control pests and diseases. A new plan from the Dutch growers association LTO, must recover the Dutch rose industry. While in the past years the availability of permitted chemical pesticides has gone down, the introduction of biological alternatives did not increase with the same speed. As a result, there are not enough pesticides to control pests and diseases in roses. In response to this, growers are using illegal pesticides. This can be read in the Dutch magazine Vakblad voor de Bloemisterij.

According to the rose grower and spokesman of the LTO, Joop van den Nouweland, besides the government and growers organisation LTO growers themselves can be blamed for the present lack of proper pesticides.  “Growers have been waiting too long to express their concerns,” mentions Van den Nouweland in the article in the Dutch magazine. According to him, in the short term, more crop protection products should be made available and growers should share their experiences.

To strengthen the position of the Dutch rose growers in the long run, a number of Dutch organizations, including LTO and FloraHolland, are participating in the Action Plan Rose. This plan focuses on a profitable rose production by 2020. The plan is based on three pillars:

1) development of cultivation systems that are less depended on chemical pesticides;

2) creation of durable certified marketing chains, and

3) within a short time – accomplishment of an effective remedies package.

source: HortiBiz / Vakblad vd Bloemisterij

Health Tips: Breast Cancer

By: AAR

Did you know that breast tumors are the most prevalent tumors among women and affects about one million women worldwide?

Did you also know that breast tumors affect men also?

Women and men should examine their breasts regularly to identify lumps or abnormalities that could signal breast tumors.  Women who are under 40 with either a family history of breast tumor or other concerns about their personal risk should consult a medical professional about when to begin mammography.

A clinical breast exam should be part of the routine checkup.  Beginning at age 20 women should have a clinical breast exam every two to three years.  Women age 40 and older should have one every year.

If you find something that you know is unusual for you, have a health care provider check it out.  A LUMP YOU FIND SHOULD NEVER BE IGNORED.

Breast self checks are key to better breast health.

As you do your exam, keep in mind that your aim is to become acquainted with how your breasts normally LOOK and FEEL.  Your knowledge of your breast texture and appearance will increase the more you perform breast checks.  This knowledge will help you identify a change more quickly, which should be reported to your health care provider.

Some of the changes you should watch out for include:
•    Lump or thickening in or near the breast or underarm area
•    Change in size or shape of the breast
•    Puckering, dimpling or redness of the breast.

If you find a lump, DO NOT PANIC!
Remember, a change you see or feel in your breast does not automatically mean you have breast tumor.  But it is best to report any change to your health care provider for further evaluation.

Here are the five basic steps to a breast self-exam:-
Step 1 – Standing with your shoulders straight and your arms on your hips, face a mirror. Look for any differences in size, shape, color, swelling or bulging of the skin, changes in the nipple, or any signs of redness or rash.
Step 2 – Raise your arms, and examine your breasts for any of those differences.
Step 3 – Gently squeeze each nipple to check for any discharge.
Step 4 – Lie down, and feel each breast with the hand of the opposite arm. Feel all the tissue, applying pressure to check deep tissue for any lumps or abnormalities.
Step 5 – Examine the breasts while you are standing or sitting, gently examining the entire breast. You may want to try this method in the shower, while the skin is slippery.

This month AAR will be offering free Breast Examinations at all they clinics for both members and non members.

Remember breast cancer is curable when detected early.

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